L.A. Times In The High Desert

L.A. Times In The High Desert | Article in LA Times

http://www.latimes.com/local/california/la-me-hesperia-halfway-homes-video-premiumvideo.html

NOT only did the LA Times write an article on Victor Valley Family Resource Center…it’s featured on the front page!! The article goes into depth about how the city of Hesperia is systematically participating in discriminatory housing practices. However, VVFRC has an even stronger impact than providing probationers who find themselves homeless, with shelter, meals, educational services, and case management. VVFRC also provides services, resources and emergency housing for those in the community such as individuals sleeping unsheltered under an overpass, a family of 12 sleeping in a hot garage or a women suffering from schizophrenia sleeping in bushes. The city of Hesperia should embrace Victor Valley Family Resource Center and support their efforts to being the solution for homelessness.

 

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Changing Your Toilet Position Could Lead The Way To Digestive Health

Changing Your Toilet Position Could Lead The Way To Digestive Health

If you’ve been having stomach and lower digestive “issues,” there could be a very simple solution. And it probably never even occurred to you as potentially a source of the problem.

When you consider that this is totally normal in other cultures, everything starts to make sense. It’s possible that this is the cause of a lot of digestion problems in the western world.

Share this astonishing insight with everyone you know. It’ll surely help someone in your circle of friends or acquaintances!

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Drug Trends Near and Far

Drug Trends Near and Far

There are always new types of drugs being used or invented in different countries that find their way into the US. But if that is not enough, there is a mixture of substances that were used in the past, which seem to be rediscovered and become popular for a new generation. If substances are not strong enough there are new ways being discovered to increase the effects. In this newsletter we will be looking at substances that are getting a large amount of news media, which may be coming to a neighborhood near you. The scary thing about these substances is teens already know more about it than parents, teachers, or law enforcement.

Flashblooding

Flashblooding, or flushblooding is when a person injects the blood of another person that has just used drugs so that they can get high off of their blood. The idea is technically very simple: inject yourself with a person’s blood who is high, so you can share in the effects. Often times, people don’t do this just to get high, but to keep from having the withdrawals the person injecting the blood is experiencing.

What are the serious issues with Flashblooding? This is the perfect way to pass on blood borne illnesses to someone else. This includes everything from viral infections, hepatitis, or even HIV. Flashblooding is a breeding ground for disease transmission of all these illnesses.

Currently, there are no documented cases of someone Flashblooding in the United States. This has become a growing problem in the poorer countries of East Africa such as Kenya and Tanzania.
The following video link below is a look at Flashblooding.

 

Devil’s Breath

There are stories circulating about a chemical known as Scopolamine or its street name “Devil’s Breath”, which is making its way around the world. The drug in other countries is blown into faces or soaked into business cards to render unsuspecting tourists incapacitated. The result leaves a person in a “zombie-like” state that leaves the victim with no ability to control their actions, leaving them at risk of having their bank accounts emptied, homes robbed, organs stolen, or raped by a street criminal.

Devil’s Breath is derived from the flower of the “borrachero” shrub, common in the South American country of Colombia. The seeds, when powdered and extracted via a chemical process, contain a chemical similar to scopolamine called “burandanga”. Borrachero has been used for hundreds of years by native South Americans in spiritual rituals. The compound is said to lead to hallucinations, frightening images, and a lack of free will. Amnesia can occur, leaving the victim powerless to recall events or identify perpetrators.

The following video links below are a look into Devil’s Breath.

 

Nutmeg

Teens and young adults have been trying to get high off of nutmeg because of its psychoactive properties. Getting high off nutmeg is not a new practice. In fact, it’s one of the oldest ways people have altered their mind, with reports of nutmeg use, and unfortunately misuse, dating all the way back to 12th century Europe. Nutmeg is actually the seed of the evergreen Myristica fragrans tree, which is native to Indonesia. The thin, protective layer that encloses the nutmeg is the spice mace, which, unlike it’s cousin spice, is regarded more as a weapon than a kitchen essential.

Eating four to eight teaspoons of ground nutmeg causes mild hallucinations, warmth in the limbs, dizziness, nausea, cottonmouth, paranoia, difficulty urinating and a hangover. Some users compare the nutmeg “high” to a hellish case of the flu. The nutmeg high is described as feeling like a “two-day hangover,” with nausea, vomiting, migraines, fevers and dizziness that can last up to 12 hours. A nutmeg high is known to teens as an inexpensive way to get high. The experience is described as unpleasant, and requires ingestion of a large unpalatable dose.

Misusing the drug is not just physically unpleasant; it can be detrimental to one’s health. Too much of the spice has in rare instances caused hearing and nerve problems.

In addition, a person can suffer from nutmeg poisoning if too much is ingested.

The following videos are a  look into the use of nutmeg:

 

I-Dosing

They put on their headphones, drape a hood over their head and drift off into the world of ‘digital highs’. Videos posted on YouTube show a young girl freaking out and leaping up in fear, a teenager shaking violently and a young boy in extreme distress. This is the world of ‘i-Dosing’, the new craze sweeping the internet in which teenagers used so-called ‘digital drugs’ to change their brains in the same way as real-life narcotics. They believe the repetitive drone-like music will give them a ‘high’ that takes them out of reality, only legally available and downloadable on the Internet.
The craze has so far been popular among teenagers in the U.S. but given how easily available the videos are, it is just a matter of time before it catches on in other countries such as Britain.
Those who come up with the ‘doses’ claim different tracks mimic different sensations you can feel by taking drugs such as Ecstasy or smoking cannabis. The reactions have been partially sceptical but some songs have become wildly popular, receiving nearly half a million hits on YouTube. But there has been such alarm in the U.S. that the Oklahoma Bureau of Narcotics and Dangerous Drugs has issued a warning to children not to do it.

Parental awareness is key to preventing future problems, since I-dosing could indicate a willingness to experiment with drugs. So that’s why we want parents to be aware of what sites their kids are visiting and not just dismiss this as something harmless on the computer. If you want to reach these kids, save these kids and keep these kids safe, parents have to be aware. They’ve got to take action.’ He added that another concern is that many of these I-dosing sites lure visitors to actual drug and drug paraphernalia sites.

The following videos are a looking into I-Dosing:

 

Sizzurp

You may know sizzurp from being the drug that hospitalized Lil’ Wayne, mercifully preventing him from releasing more music or skateboarding. Sizzurp is made up of codeine cough syrup, promethazine, grape soda and dissolved Jolly Ranchers, percolating inside a styrofoam cup like a goblet of gastrointestinal grief. Motor-skill impairment, lethargy, drowsiness, hallucinations, and dissociative feelings are all part of sizzurp’s plan for you, but don’t worry, all that will go away once you start to feel the itch of codeine addiction. And although it was popularized in the ’90s by the underground hip-hop scene of Houston, it’s steadily been becoming the favorite son of rappers and footballers looking to accidentally overdose on something they should be dipping pancakes in.

The prescription-strength cough syrup used in purple drank contains codeine and promethazine. The cough syrup is used in doses much higher than medically recommended and is typically mixed with ingredients such as the soft drinks Sprite or Mountain Dew. Hard candy such as a Jolly Rancher is thrown in for extra sweetness. The purplish color of the purple drank comes from dyes in the cough syrup. The amount of cough syrup used at times can exceed up to 25 times the recommended dose.] The concoction is typically consumed out of Styrofoam cups.
There are numerous slang terms for purple drank, including sizzurp, lean, syrup, drank, barre, purple jelly, Texas tea, dirty Sprite, and Tsikuni.

The following videos are a look into Sizzurp:

 

BHO – Butane Honey Oil

Butane hash oil (BHO) or better known as “honey oil” is made from marijuana. Butane hash oil gets it’s name from the process from which it’s made, Butane hash oil is made by placing marijuana (often trimmings) in some type of holding container, and pushing butane through the container in a manner that doesn’t allow the plant material to escape, yet allows the butane to escape. The marijuana inside the container is stripped of it’s cannabinoids by the butane. The butane/marijuana liquid mixture that escaped is then evaporated, getting rid of as much foreign substances (mainly butane) as possible and keeping as much of the good stuff as possible. The end result can look like honey, or wax, etc.
Properly purged butane hash oil is far purer than the raw marijuana that people are smoking, considering that a lot of raw marijuana smoke is from the plant material. The highest I have ever heard a reputable marijuana testing laboratory say raw marijuana tested at was the high 20%s. I have seen a lot of butane hash oil that has ranked in the 80%s and even 90%s according to reputable testing laboratories.

One of the most dangerous issues surrounding the making of BHO is the process. Because butane is used it is highly flammable substance. There has been several instances where explosions and fires have occurred during the cooking process. The availability of buying large amounts of butane has also become a large problem. There are no state regulations prohibiting the amount of butane that can be purchased at once.
So it has been brought up what is more dangerous the smoking or the making of BHO? Hopefully you don’t live next to someone trying to make their own…….

The following videos are a look at BHO the process and the dangers:

 

Moon Rocks

Moonrocks also known as Copycat Caviar or C3PO is easily one of the most powerful cannabis products on the planet-they have taken an average cannabis bud and kicked it into high gear with the hash oil and kief. This process leads the product to carry a 51.2% THC rating.

How are  Moonrocks made? Dried cured buds, honey oil and dry sift is needed to make the rocks. FIrst you take cured marijuana buds and coat them with honey oil. BHO or alcohol extracted honey oil is used to coat the bud with honey oil. After coating the buds with the oil, they are placed in a jar that contains dry sift (keif). It is then shaken around until the oil covered buds get coated with a layer of crystals. Dry sift is the result of taking dry cured buds and rubbing them over a fine screen and detaching the crystals from the plant, without the use water or any solvent. The result is a powdery pile of white to light green trichomes, that can be smoked alone or added to cannabis. Once the buds are drizzled and sugared, they are able to be smoked.

The following video is a look at the process of making moon rocks:

 

Original Written by Reach Out Newsletter

Here at Reach Out we know how important it is to stay ahead of the curve. We are dedicated to bring our law enforcement partners up to date training in alcohol trends and synthetic drugs. We not only will help you get informed about these ever changing drugs, but help find solutions for your administration staff and city/county council bodies to limit the availability of these illegal substances in your community. These solutions may consist of ordinances, regulations, or laws you may not be familiar with.

Reach Out has a long track record of presenting information about synthetic drugs for some of our partners. We have done work sessions prior to city council meetings to help educate the community about problems related to alcohol, tobacco, and synthetic drugs.

If you have any questions reference our training or would like to set up a training or presentation please contact Omar Gonzalez as (909) 982-8641 or email him at omar@we-reachout.org.

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California’s largest public university is working to find — and help — its homeless students

California’s largest public university is working to find — and help — its homeless students | Written by NewOk

A recent study shows 1 in 10 of nearly 475,000 students at Cal State don’t have a steady place to sleep each night — and one in five don’t have regular access to food.

The only way to get an official number of homeless students is to look at financial aid applications, but that’s not always accurate, The Los Angeles Times found. Financial aid records show there are about 56,588 students in the U.S. who identify as homeless, but Cal State found as many as 47,000 students — just within the Cal State registry — lack a fixed place to sleep each night.

“There were times I thought about dropping out,” Shellv Candler, a Cal State student, told the Times. “But going to school was my escape — to be able to take all that anger, frustration, sadness, disappointment, to take all of that and put it into something as proactive as my education…. This is my chance to be able to do something with my life.”

In efforts to help keep students like Candler enrolled, Cal State is working with its 23 campuses to help provide them with the necessities. The Times reported the biggest public university in the United States, which costs about $5,500 a year to attend, is trying various experiments to help those in need, including building food pantries, offering emergency grants, giving hotel vouchers, providing counseling and more.

The Times pointed out just how hard it can be to collect data regarding homelessness or malnutrition because it’s not required information and because of the associated stigmas. By speaking with and interviewing students, faculty members learned many were unaware homelessness extends beyond sleeping on the street every night.

The university hopes to start intervention programs across its campuses that will offer emergency housing and food pantries for students who need them. The Times reports there are also bills going through the state legislature that, if passed, would require schools to have a person responsible for working with homeless students on every state campus as well as dorms that would remain open when classes are out of session.

The findings ultimately will help Cal State launch intervention support programs on every campus, Crutchfield said. Eleven — including Long Beach — offer some sort of support, such as food pantries or emergency housing. Others have a long way to go.

A number of higher-education bills have also been moving through the California legislature, including one to designate homeless point persons on state campuses and another to keep some dorms open when classes are out of session.

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City of Victorville Launches Community Needs Assessment Survey

City of Victorville Launches Community Needs Assessment Survey

City of Victorville Launches Community Needs Assessment Survey – Written by Hesperia Resorter | on Jul 28, 2016

The city of Victorville is seeking input from the community and has lanched an online community needs assessment survey at www.victorvillerec.com.

Individuals who complete the survey will be entered to win a prize. Survey responses must be received no later than Oct. 15. The survey entitled, “Your Opinion Counts,” was developed to learn what individuals think about Victorville parks, recreational programs, facilities, and more. The public will be able to express ideas about new programs and facilities and voice concerns about existing infrastructure.

“I implore everyone to complete this needs assessment so you  can be  a part of building a stronger Victorville,”

“I implore everyone to complete this needs assessment so you  can be  a part of building a stronger Victorville,” says Victorville Mayor, Gloria Garcia. “Your input is vital to ensuring we plan effectively for our future and provide programs and services that are meaningful and beneficial to our community.”

To take the survey, go to www.victorvillerec.com and click on the “Your Opinion Counts” link. One survey per household  can be submitted, and all completed entries will be automatically entered for an opportunity prize drawing. 

Individuals who do not have a computer are invited to use computers at the Victorville City Library or take the survey at two events to be hosted at Victorville City Hall: National Night Out, Aug. 2 from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m., and the Fall Festival, Oct. 1 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Visit the “Your Opinion Counts” booth at either event. Prizes will be drawn during the Victorville Community Yard Sale at Hook Community Center on Saturday, Oct. 15.

For more information about the community needs assessment survey, contact Hook Community Center at (760) 245-5551.

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California Man Builds Portable Shelters on Wheels for Oakland’s Homeless: ‘I Wish That I Could Help Them All’

California Man Builds Portable Shelters on Wheels for Oakland’s Homeless: ‘I Wish That I Could Help Them All’

California Man Builds Portable Shelters on Wheels for Oakland’s Homeless: ‘I Wish That I Could Help Them All’

BY CATHY FREE @cathyjfree 08/18/2016 AT 05:50 PM EDT

Know a great homeless story? Send suggestions to support@vvfrc.org. For more inspiring stories, read the latest issue of PEOPLE magazine. Link here for the original article in People Magazine.

Gregory Kloehn was turning a condemned building in Oakland, California, into condominiums in 1998 when he noticed that some of the homeless people camping near his project had built themselves small shelters with cardboard, two-by-fours and sheets of plastic.

Every morning, when he returned to his job site, city sanitation workers would come by and clear the hovels away, forcing the occupants to go in search of new materials and rebuild from scratch.

“I admired how they threw them together every day and didn’t give up,” Kloehn, 45, tells PEOPLE. “As I watched them go in search of new garbage to build with, something clicked. I thought, ‘I wonder if I could build a home like that in a few days with throwaway supplies that I found on the streets?’ ”
One week and $50 later, using an old box-spring mattress as a base, walls made from old futon frames, a camper shell as a roof and a refrigerator door for a front door, Kloehn’s first miniature home was finished.

After putting wheels on the abode to make it portable, he decided to give it to a homeless couple one cold and rainy night.

California Man Builds Portable Shelters on Wheels for Oakland’s Homeless: ‘I Wish That I Could Help Them All’| Heroes Among Us, Good Deeds, Real People Stories
Gregory Kloehn
BRIAN REYNOLDS

“I handed them the keys and some champagne and they immediately started debating what color to paint it,” Kloehn remembers with a laugh. “They were so grateful and it made such a huge difference for them to have a shelter they could take with them. I knew right then that I was on to something.”

Eighteen years later, with help from volunteers, Kloehn has made more than 50 portable homes with unique touches such as Victorian color schemes, mailboxes and hardwood floors, through his Homeless Homes Project, using recycled supplies found on Oakland’s streets.

California Man Builds Portable Shelters on Wheels for Oakland’s Homeless: ‘I Wish That I Could Help Them All’| Heroes Among Us, Good Deeds, Real People Stories
Gregory Kloehn
BRIAN REYNOLDS

“Contractors illegally dump their stuff on the street so they don’t have to pay to take it the dump,” he tells PEOPLE, “so I have no problem finding two-by-fours, plywood, shelving, shingles and paint. Last time I checked, I had 150 gallons of perfectly good paint. Nothing goes to waste.”

Oakland City officials applaud Kloehn’s efforts, even though they wish they could get people off the streets permanently rather than support short-term solutions.

California Man Builds Portable Shelters on Wheels for Oakland’s Homeless: ‘I Wish That I Could Help Them All’| Heroes Among Us, Good Deeds, Real People Stories
BRIAN REYNOLDS

“Greg’s a great guy – although the portable homes don’t get at the root of homelessness, they do provide better shelter than a tent,” Joe DeVries, assistant to the Oakland City administrator, tells PEOPLE. “And they’re also giving unsheltered people a higher sense of safety.”

Married with two teenage sons (his wife, Erica, teaches children’s theater), Kloehn, who works as a “jack of all trades” when he isn’t building mini homes, donates many of his creative shelters to single homeless women or people with health issues.

California Man Builds Portable Shelters on Wheels for Oakland’s Homeless: ‘I Wish That I Could Help Them All’| Heroes Among Us, Good Deeds, Real People Stories
Gregory Kloehn
BRIAN REYNOLDS

“I try to give them to people who I know really need them and will keep the homes and not try to sell them,” he says. “I ask only one thing: That if their situation changes and they no longer need it, that they give it somebody else who does. I want them used for people – not for dogs or some kid’s playhouse. So far, people have been pretty good about honoring that.”

California Man Builds Portable Shelters on Wheels for Oakland’s Homeless: ‘I Wish That I Could Help Them All’| Heroes Among Us, Good Deeds, Real People Stories
BRIAN REYNOLDS

Having a home that is off the ground away from rats, insects, wind and rain has made a huge difference to Rhonda Davis, 62, who became homeless after losing her job eight years ago. Kloehn built her haven around an old satellite dish.

“It’s a blessing to have my little home – Greg’s kindness has given me a stepping stone on my path to recovery,” Davis tells PEOPLE. “When I lock my little door at night, I go to sleep with peace of mind.”

Adds Sheila Williams, 58, homeless for 17 years: “This little house of mine on wheels is a dry and warm place to sleep and a place where I can feel comfortable and safe. It’s the best gift anybody has ever given me. I wake up every morning feeling grateful.”

Kloehn says he has only one regret since starting his project. “I wish that I could help them all,” he tells PEOPLE. “I wish that we could do away with homelessness and I wouldn’t have to be out here at all, looking for materials. As long as people are living on the streets, I intend to keep doing what I’m doing for as long as I can.”

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